Where Ticks Live

Click on any round tick icon below the map to see the type of tick & the US geographic distribution.

American Dog Tick (Dermacentor variabilis)

Where found: Widely distributed east of the Rocky Mountains. Also occurs in limited areas on the Pacific Coast.
Transmits: Visit CDC.gov website to learn about what this tick may transmit.
Comments:
 The highest risk of being bitten occurs during spring and summer. Dog ticks are sometimes called wood ticks. Adult females are most likely to bite humans.

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Blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis)

Where found: Widely distributed across the eastern United States.
Transmits: Visit CDC.gov website to learn about what this tick may transmit.
Comments:
 The greatest risk of being bitten exists in the spring, summer, and fall. However, adults may be out searching for a host any time winter temperatures are above freezing. Stages most likely to bite humans are nymphs and adult females.

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Brown Dog Tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus)

Where found: Worldwide.
Transmits: Visit CDC.gov website to learn about what this tick may transmit.
Comments:
 Dogs are the primary host for the brown dog tick in each of its life stages, but the tick may also bite humans or other mammals.

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Gulf Coast Tick (Amblyomma maculatum)

Where found: Coastal areas of the U.S. along the Atlantic coast and the Gulf of Mexico.
Transmits: Visit CDC.gov website to learn about what this tick may transmit.
Comments:
Larvae and nymphs feed on birds and small rodents, while adult ticks feed on deer and other wildlife.

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Lone Star Tick (Amblyomma americanum)

Where found: Widely distributed in the southeastern and eastern United States.
Transmits: Visit CDC.gov website to learn about what this tick may transmit.
Comments:
A very aggressive tick that bites humans. The adult female is distinguished by a white dot or “lone star” on her back.

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Rocky Mountain Wood Tick (Dermacentor andersoni)

Where found: Rocky Mountain states and southwestern Canada from elevations of 4,000 to 10,500 feet.
Transmits: Visit CDC.gov website to learn about what this tick may transmit.
Comments: Adult ticks feed primarily on large mammals. Larvae and nymphs feed on small rodents.

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Western Blacklegged Tick (Ixodes pacificus)

Where found: Along the Pacific coast of the U.S., particularly northern California.
Transmits: Visit CDC.gov website to learn about what this tick may transmit.
Comments: Nymphs often feed on lizards, as well as other small animals. Stages most likely to bite humans are nymphs and adult females.

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You can learn more about these ticks at the CDC website.

The data from this map was compiled from the CDC government maps of geographic distribution of ticks that bite humans, (https://www.cdc.gov/ticks/geographic_distribution.html).

As stated on the CDC website:

These maps show the general distribution of human-biting ticks in the contiguous United States. Populations of ticks may be found outside shaded areas. Naturally occurring populations of the ticks described below do not occur in Alaska; however, the brown dog tick occurs in Hawaii.

Note that adult ticks are the easiest to identify and male and female ticks of the same species may look different. Nymphal and larval ticks are very small and may be hard to identify.

This map has been designed to answer the question “What ticks should I be concerned about at a regional scale?” Please consult a local public health authority or USDA Agricultural Extension Office to determine more specific information at the state, county, or municipal level.”